St Andrew's paid departing chief executive Philip Sugarman £751,000 in his final year

The healthcare charity's accounts for 2013/14 show he was paid £285,000 in salary, £389,000 in lieu of notice and £76,000 compensation for loss of office

Philip Sugarman
Philip Sugarman

The former chief executive of the mental healthcare charity St Andrew’s was paid £751,000 in the year of his departure, the charity’s accounts show.

Philip Sugarman received a salary of £285,000, pay in lieu of notice of £389,000, £76,000 as compensation for loss of office and £1,000 classified as "other benefits", the charity’s accounts for the year to 31 March 2014 show.

Sugarman left the charity on 28 February because of ill health and was succeeded by Gil Baldwin, who started on a salary of £325,000.

In the year to 31 March 2013, Sugarman was paid £653,000, a rise of £100,000 on the previous year, putting him among the top five highest-paid staff in the sector.

He then voluntarily took a 50 per cent pay cut after stepping down from the role of medical director at the charity, which he filled at the same time as being chief executive.

The 176-year old charity provides NHS care, with more than 1,000 in-patient places in Birmingham, Essex, Mansfield and Northampton.

Sugarman arrived at the charity in 2005. In the year to 31 March 2005, it had an income of £104.7m, which has grown to £189.4m in the last year. It had 3,200 staff at the year’s end.

A spokeswoman for St Andrew's Healthcare said: "Professor Sugarman left our employment in February on health grounds. Due to his seniority, his notice period was longer than for other executives."

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