The stories of the month: Law & Governance

The Sunday Telegraph removed a claim in a story that War on Want had been stripped of government funding as a result of alleged antisemitic remarks, after the charity protested. The story originally claimed the Department for International Development had "pulled" War on Want's funding after hearing secret recordings of antisemitic comments allegedly made by speakers at an "Israeli Apartheid Week" rally sponsored by War on Want. But DfID denied the claim, saying it had not been funding the charity at the time the comments were made. The charity said the article was a "complete fabrication". Third Sector understands that War on Want has not received DfID funding over the past 12 months and has not applied to DfID for funding since 2012. War on Want filed a complaint with the press regulator Ipso.

- The Charity Commission later opened an operational case into War on Want in relation to its campaigning activities.

The Charity Commission has launched a new prototype online registration service. The commission said the new "beta" registration service offered a number of improvements to its previous online service, including clearer application forms, a charity name-check facility, auto-prompting and completion, hard-copy printing and quicker turnaround times. It will run alongside its predecessor for a short period until it has passed tests.

The Charity Commission is looking into "serious regulatory concerns" about a foundation set up by the former Chelsea footballer Didier Drogba. The regulator said it was looking into concerns about the management and administration of the Didier Drogba Foundation, "significant sums" that had been raised and not spent, and allegations that donors and the public might have been misled. The initiative came after an investigation into the charity by the Daily Mail. Drogba said the story was "factually incorrect and libellous" and he was beginning legal proceedings.

The grant-giving charity Hospice Aid UK has appealed to the charity tribunal to force the Charity Commission to step in after another charity renamed itself Hospice UK. Hospice Aid UK, which gives grants to hospices across the UK, objected after the hospice support charity Help the Hospices rebranded itself in 2014. Hospice Aid UK believes the name change has caused confusion.

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