Study of philanthropic behaviours launched by Ian MacQuillin's Rogare think tank

The research will be led by the fundraising academic Adrian Sargeant and funded by the Resource Alliance

Ian MacQuillin
Ian MacQuillin

A two-year project to explore philanthropic behaviours and how they improve wellbeing around the world has been launched.

The project, known as Tomorrow’s Philanthropy, is being led by Rogare, Plymouth University’s fundraising think tank, and the Resource Alliance, which builds the fundraising capacity of charities.

The funding for the collaboration has been provided by the Resource Alliance, which is known best for hosting the annual International Fundraising Conference in the Netherlands.

The research will be led by the Plymouth University fundraising professor Adrian Sargeant, who recently announced he was to stand down as a trustee of the Institute of Fundraising, and conducted this year, the organisations said in a statement.

It will focus on five types of innovations and philanthropic behaviours: social entrepreneurship, impact investment, venture philanthropy, disintermediation (a method of donor-to-beneficiary support without the involvement of a non-profit agency) and organised philanthropy.

The research will consider what the philanthropic landscape will look like in 10 years and what the implications will be for resources, policies and practice. The results will be presented at several Resource Alliance events during 2016.

Asked what made the study different from existing research, Ian MacQuillin, director of Rogare, told Third Sector: "It’s bringing in these different forms of philanthropic action that don’t fall within the realms of traditional philanthropy.

"One of the big contributions of this will be identifying what people involved in social entrepreneurship and venture capitalism think about the other forms of social action and where they complement and possibly inhibit each other."

Kyla Shawyer, chief executive of the Resource Alliance, said in a statement: "We believe that this research will help fundraisers to understand these emerging models, how they affect the sector and, very importantly, how they affect social change."

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