Tearfund posts record income for 2015/16

The Christian aid charity's accounts show it brought in £72m, an increase of £10m on the previous year

Detail from Tearfund's annual report
Detail from Tearfund's annual report

The Christian aid charity Tearfund brought in a record income of more than £72m in 2015/16, an increase of approximately £10m on the previous year.

The charity’s accounts for the year to 31 March 2016, published on the Companies House website last week, show the charity had an income of £72.2m, compared with £61.9m the previous year.

The latest accounts show that donations increased by more than £8m, from £40.6m in 2014/15 to £48.7m the year after.

The 2016 accounts show that expenditure also increased, from £63.9m to £68.1m.

The charity said emergency appeals after crises in the Middle East and Nepal were the main reasons behind the surge in income.

Nigel Harris, chief executive of Tearfund, said: "Tearfund is working in some of the poorest and most challenging countries in the world, and the increase in our income is a credit to our supporters who are responding to these needs.

"The additional £10m in the last financial year highlights the excellent response to emergency appeals for Nepal and the Middle East, as well as increased income from the UK government and other institutional donors."

The accounts show that top pay at the charity appears to have fallen.

The most recent documents show that four employees earned more than £60,000 in 2015/16, compared with nine the year before.

The accounts show that the previous chief executive, Matthew Frost, received payments totalling £97,500 in 2014/15. His successor Harris, who joined in November 2015, received £35,285 for the part of the year he worked.

A spokeswoman for the charity said Harris was on an annual salary of £90,400.

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