A third of registrations in Scotland are charitable incorporated organisations, OSCR says

The Scottish regulator recently registered the 500th SCIO since the form became available in April 2011

Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator
Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator

Scottish charitable incorporated organisations now account for about a third of all charitable registrations in Scotland, according to the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator.

The OSCR said the form had proved popular in the Scottish charity sector and it had recently registered the 500th such organisation since the form became available in April 2011.

The OSCR said on Twitter that 30 per cent of all applications for new charities were now for SCIOs.

The new legal form allows charities to enter into contracts, employ staff and incur debts as corporate entities but with limited liability for trustees and members.

The 500th SCIO, the South East Integration Network, a Glasgow-based charity that coordinates and provides community services, was registered on 18 January, the regulator said. 

David Robb, chief executive of the OSCR, said: "It’s encouraging to see that, despite the economic climate, interest in charitable status remains high at about 120 applications a month. It’s also heartening to see that about a third of new applications are for SCIOs, and we will be watching closely to see if this increases in the future."

Charities in England and Wales have been able to register as CIOs since early January. So far, 71 charities have registered as CIOs, according to Charity Commission figures.

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