Third Sector at Large: Horseplay in Bristol as Chas shuns the Palace for Burnley

Horses playing football, Prince Charles's support for Burnley and what life's like at the Charity Commission are on our minds this week

- Gracie May, a 17 hand-high heavy horse, was nursed back to health after being rescued, emaciated and almost hairless, by Horseworld in Bristol. But last week she had to grit her teeth and play football at the charity's visitor centre with James Wilson and Joe Edwards of Bristol City. This was part of a stunt to promote links between Horseworld and City's under-16s club. At her feet was a 'treat ball feeder' that she had to knock around with her soup-plate sized hooves to get access to the treats. Enough to make a horse laugh - or not, as in the case of Gracie May: just look at the expression on her face. The players looked a bit nonplussed as well.

- While we're on football, does Burnley, a City rival in the Championship, have more than its fair share of grumpy old men among its supporters? Tony Blair's pugnacious former press secretary, Alistair Campbell, is known to be a lifelong supporter, and last week Prince Charles revealed that he's a fan too. Apparently a consortium of his charities, including the British Asian Trust, is highly active in this bleak Pennine outpost, and the club has sent the prince a complimentary VIP season ticket. So if the team's underperforming and you hear a highly cultured voice in the background muttering "it really is appalling", you'll know who it is.

- So what is life really like at the Charity Commission right now? Pretty dire, says one missive to Third Sector, unsigned on the grounds of the author's fear of being rumbled and sacked for leaking. Its assertion that "morale has significantly dropped with the constant reviews and restructuring" seems plausible, chimes with anecdotal evidence and is discussed on the opposite page. Allegations about "dreadful behaviour" by individuals would, of course, require hard evidence incompatible with anonymous testimony. When people feel strongly enough to appeal for public attention, there's often something going on - although it might just be a personal grudge. Watch this space.

- Social enterprise is actually going to get some teeth, if a news release last week is to be believed. SCA, a Southampton-based health and social care outfit that already runs six dental practices in Hampshire, is holding a seminar with the lawyers Hempsons about how to challenge the monopoly of private dentists with a "community-enhanced approach." But are they biting off more than they can chew?

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