Turnover of Nuffield Health goes up by 12 per cent

Healthcare charity's 2012 financial report also shows 25 per cent increase in operating surplus and a slight drop in salary for chief executive David Mobbs

David Mobbs
David Mobbs

Nuffield Health’s turnover increased by 12 per cent, to £645m, in 2012 compared with the previous year, according to its latest annual report.

The healthcare charity’s Report and Financial Statements 2012, released today, shows that its total operating surplus excluding exceptional items increased by 25 per cent over the year, to £23m.

In his statement in the report, chair Russell Hardy, who took up his post in June, says the charity’s finances are "robust".

"Nuffield Health’s underlying earnings have increased by 21 per cent over the past two years," he says. "Over the same period, the charity has ploughed about £115m into capital expenditure – more than half of which has been spent on expanding and developing the services we provide – yet in that time our net debt has increased by only £14m."

The report says that hospitals account for 70 per cent of the charity’s turnover and in 2012 the division’s revenues rose almost 9 per cent to £461.6m, largely because of an increase in work for the NHS.

The charity’s consumer fitness and wellbeing centres also grew over the year, with membership of its facilities increasing from 134,000 to almost 191,000, due in part to the acquisition of Green’s Health and Fitness. Total capital spending on this division was £20m.

The report also indicates that the salary paid to David Mobbs, its group chief executive, fell slightly in 2012. It says that in 2011 one employee’s salary was within the range £850,000 to £859,999. In 2012 there were no employees in this band, but one in the band £840,000 to £849,999. Mobbs is the highest-paid person in the charity sector, according to recent research by Third Sector.

The report shows that in 2012 there were 12 employees paid between £210,000 and £529,999. It says that the remuneration of senior executives is determined by the Executive Remuneration and Succession Committee, which takes independent advice from specialist executive remuneration consultants.

The report says that a Trustees’ Remuneration Committee considered the remuneration of the trustees with the chair and it was agreed that this should not be increased. It says the chair is paid £49,000, the deputy chair and the chairs of board committees £35,000 each, and trustees £28,000. Ten board meetings of the trustees were held in the year, according to the report, as well as the Annual General Meeting. It says that trustees also visited the charity’s hospitals and other facilities.

Mobbs said in a statement that the charity’s success had been achieved by "the dedication, passion and care from our 11,000 employees".

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