Young 'do more workplace fundraising'

Research by Give as you Live, founded by Polly Gowers, shows that employees aged between 16 and 25 are more likely to take part in fundraising activity at work than older colleagues

Polly Gowers
Polly Gowers

Young people are more likely to take part in fundraising at work than their older colleagues, according to new research by the donation platform Give as you Live.

Give as you Live, which enables online shoppers to donate to charity using money from retailers' marketing budgets, surveyed 1,022 workers in the UK between 21 and 24 June.

It found that 41 per cent of respondents had taken part in fundraising activities at work.

But the survey showed that 54 per cent of employees aged between 16 and 24 had taken part in fundraising activity at work, compared with 41 per cent of workers aged 25 to 44 and 39 per cent of those aged 45 to 54.

Slightly more than half of those surveyed also said they did not think the company they worked for had an official charity, or charities, that it planned to support this year.

Polly Gowers, the founder and chief executive of Everyclick, the company behind Give as you Live, who will be speaking at the convention today about giving in the workplace, said: "There are easy ways to encourage regular fundraising. In the digital age, corporate social responsibility initiatives needn't put pressure on people's time, and can instead be seen as a way to increase employee commitment and morale."

- Read more on this year's IoF National Convention

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