Charity chief executive salaries drop by 3.1 per cent in a year, Acevo survey reveals

Research by the chief executives body shows the median average salary fell from £60,000 in 2011 to £58,139 this year

Half of charity chief executives had no pay rise this year
Half of charity chief executives had no pay rise this year

The average salary for charity chief executives has fallen by 3.1 per cent this year, according to figures in Acevo’s latest pay survey. 

The results of the study, published today, show that the median salary for charity chief executives has fallen from £60,000 in 2011 to £58,139 this year.

Based on responses in the summer from 576 charity chief executives and 159 chairs, the results also show that slightly more than half of charity chiefs – 51 per cent – did not receive a pay rise in 2011.

Of those that did receive a pay rise, two-thirds saw their salaries increase in line with inflation.

The survey also shows that the gap between the average pay of male and female charity chief executives has fallen from £10,100 in 2011 to £7,500 this year.

The proportion of female chief executives is unchanged from last year’s survey at 46 per cent of respondents.

Acevo said the difference in salary between men and women could be explained in part by the fact that there were disproportionately fewer female chief executives among large charities, which tend to pay higher salaries. Charities with annual incomes of more than £5m were more than twice as likely to employ a male chief executive, the survey indicated. 

Sir Stephen Bubb, chief executive of Acevo, said the survey showed third sector leaders were reacting responsibly to the financial problems of the sector by exercising pay restraint.

The survey also shows that the proportion of male chairs in the voluntary sector has increased from 65.5 per cent last year to 76.4 per cent this year.

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