Charity lotteries raised almost £155m for good causes in 2012/13

Figures from the Gambling Commission show that the amount has risen by 50 per cent in the past two years

The amount of money raised for good causes through charity lotteries has grown by 50 per cent over the past two years, figures from the Gambling Commission show.

Data from the regulator shows that charity lotteries raised almost £155m for charities in 2012/13, up from £103.5m in 2010/11. They raised £132.1m in 2011/12.

Total income from charity lotteries in 2012/13 was £346.3m, meaning that 44.7 per cent went to good causes with the rest going on prize money and administration costs. This is a slight increase from 43.9 per cent in 2011/12.

The total includes funds raised for good causes by the Health Lottery, which began selling tickets in September 2011, and raised more than £24m for good causes in its first year.

The Gambling Commission said that the Royal British Legion raised £11.5m from a weekly lottery, raffles and scratchcards over the course of the year.

Clive Mollett, chair of the Lotteries Council, the membership body for charity lotteries, said that larger sums could be raised for good causes if regulation of charity lotteries was scaled back.

"We believe that charity lotteries could provide even more public benefit if ministers were to look at cutting back on some of the unnecessarily heavy regulation that restricts our activities, and we hope they will do so," he said.

Andy Ricketts

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