Charity scandals 'putting some off working in the sector'

According to a survey carried out for a communications firm, more than a third of respondents said safeguarding scandals had deterred them from working for charities

Are people being put off working in the sector?
Are people being put off working in the sector?

More than a third of people say that recent charity scandals have put them off working in the voluntary sector, new research shows.

In a survey of 1,000 adults carried out by the research company Populus on behalf of the culture and communications firm Kin&Co, 37 per cent of respondents said recent safeguarding scandals had deterred them from working in the charity sector.

The survey also found that 45 per cent of respondents had heard negative views about working cultures in charities.

Almost one in five workers has left or has considered leaving a job in the charity sector because they believed they were not making enough of a difference, the survey found.

The survey also highlighted the growing popularity of ethical businesses and social enterprises, with 53 per cent of respondents believing they could make a positive impact on the world at a business compared with just 35 per cent for a charity.

Issues with the perceived culture in the charity sector were also highlighted, with only 29 per cent of respondents to the survey saying the culture in charities appealed to them.

In comparison, 57 per cent said the culture of a purpose-driven business appealed to them, the survey found.

But only 41 per cent of respondents said they would prefer to fund meaningful work in a business rather than a charity.

Becci Gould, senior account director at Kin&Co, said: "The lack of investment in culture in the charity sector is concerning. Once the leader of meaningful work, the sector’s got a long way to go to rescue its reputation and compete with purpose-driven businesses."

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