Chief executive of Scottish charity leaders body recognised in New Year Honours

Pat Armstrong is given an OBE and Cathy Warwick, former chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives, is made a dame

Pat Armstrong
Pat Armstrong

The chief executive of the Scottish charity leaders body Acosvo has been recognised in the New Year Honours list.

Pat Armstrong, who has led Acosvo since 2003, receives an OBE for services to voluntary organisations and is one of a host of charity figures to be honoured in this year’s list. 

Cathy Warwick, who retired in the summer after more than eight years as chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives, was made a dame.

CBEs went to Stephen Howlett, former group chief executive of the social housing provider Peabody, Elizabeth Dymond, director of finance and corporate services at The Charity for Civil Servants, Jane Hamlyn, chair of the grant-maker the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, and Dawn Hill, chair of Black Cultural Archives, which celebrates the history of African and Caribbean people in Britain.

Caroline Dive, professor of cancer pharmacology and deputy director of the Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, Tom Delay, chief executive of the not-for-profit carbon reduction organisation the Carbon Trust, and Veronica Wadley, chair of the Arts Council London, were also appointed CBE.

There were OBEs for Sophie Andrews, chief executive of the older people’s helpline The Silver Line, David Johnstone, chief executive of the Social Mobility Foundation, Emma Knights, chief executive of the National Governance Association, which supports governors in maintained schools and academies, and Geraldine McAndrew, chief executive of the grant-maker Buttle UK.

The same honour was awarded to Sarah Alexander, chief executive and artistic director of the National Youth Orchestra, Jackie Hewitt-Main, founder and chief executive of the Cascade Foundation, which supports people with dyslexia, head injuries or other learning difficulties, Naomi Marek, chief executive of the disability charity Sky Badger, and Annika Small, co-founder of the Centre for Acceleration of Social Technology.

Pauline Shaw, director of care and service development at the Royal Star and Garter Homes, Bartholomew Smith, founder and chair of the Amber Foundation, which supports homeless unemployed young people, and Sally Uren, chief executive of Forum for the Future, which promotes sustainable development, were also appointed OBE.

Among the many voluntary sector figures to be given MBEs were George Black, Northern Ireland district chairman for the Royal British Legion, Sara Beauregarde, co-founder of Youth Vision, which supports young people with special educational needs, and Sara Fitzsimmons, founder and executive director of the family bereavement charity Simba.

MBEs also went to Bazil Meade, founder of the London Community Gospel Choir, Adrian Jackson, artistic director and chief executive of Cardboard Citizens, which stages theatre productions with and for homeless people, and Diana Porter, founder and chief executive of Fresh Start – New Beginnings, which supports children and young people who have been sexually abused.

The Cabinet Office said 70 per cent of the 1,123 recipients were people who had done outstanding work in their communities in either a voluntary or paid capacity, which is a lower proportion than in recent New Year Honours lists.

The majority of the 318 recipients of the British Empire Medal, the lowest of the honours announced today, were recognised for community or voluntary service.

These include Dawn Parkinson, a Samaritans volunteer in Belfast, Margaret Jamieson, who supports community projects through the Blue Door charity shop in Kirkwall, Orkney, and Dave Williams, from Westbury near Shrewsbury in Shropshire, who has volunteered for the British Red Cross for the past 40 years.

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