Fundraising: Database device will identify wealthy

A new database tool has been launched to help charities target individuals with significant wealth, property or share investments who might be big donors.

CCR Data has set up the Prospect Profiler to ensure charities don't waste funds by asking the wrong people for money.

The MS Society is one charity that has said it is likely to use the new database profiler.

Ken Walker, marketing director at the society, said: "These sorts of things are quite useful."

The new data auditing tool filters data information sent in by the charities and provides a 'tag' against those people it identifies as wealthy prospects.

Such lists are based on the top 2.5 million private investors, and property owners within the top two tax brackets.

Prospect Profiler comprises three optional tagging products, each able to tag an organisation's contact records according to their known wealth, investment portfolio values over the past 20 years and property value.

CCR offers a free Prospect Profiler data audit, allowing organisations to see how many matches are found in their data, and its condition, before spending any money.

CCR Data said that the information it provides is already in the public domain. Edward Spicer, the company's managing director, said: "The market has for many years needed a low-cost way of identifying wealthy and influential people, high-value shareholders and top-end property owners on in-house databases."

The MS Society has already used another CCR tool called Wealth Tag, which was the inspiration for the new Prospect Profiler, to reduce wastage in fundraising.

But Walker said: "We wouldn't use it for singling out specific individuals.

Having wealth isn't the single biggest variable when it comes to charitable giving - it's about having some link with the cause."

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