Legacy income at record high of £3bn in 2017/18

The figure, a rise of £200m on the previous year, comes from the legacy information provider Smee & Ford

Legacies: all-time high
Legacies: all-time high

Legacy income for charities reached a record high of £3bn in the 2017/18 financial year, new figures released by the legacy information provider Smee & Ford show.

The figure is a rise of £200m on the previous year’s figures, the analysis shows.

This means there was a 10 per cent growth in legacy income, according to the company.

A Smee & Ford spokesman was unable to explain the reasons behind the overall increase, but he noted that the value of estates had begun to fall recently as house prices slowed.

The legacy income figure is made up of residual bequests, which are based on a portion of the total estate value, and pecuniary bequests, which are usually a defined amount in a will.

Conditional bequests, such as those that occur when specific conditions of a will are met, were also included in the data.

The data comes from more than 11,000 charities and is based on data from Smee & Ford’s legacy monitoring service, its financial information service Charity Financials and the Charity Commission’s website.

One charitable bequest to the nation worth £440m was excluded from the data.

The full legacy trends report will be published next week.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in
Follow us on:

Latest Fundraising Jobs

RSS Feed

Third Sector Insight

Sponsored webcasts, surveys and expert reports from Third Sector partners

Markel

Expert Hub

Insurance advice from Markel

Charity property: could you be entitled to a huge VAT saving?

Charity property: could you be entitled to a huge VAT saving?

Promotion from Third Sector promotion

When a property is being constructed, VAT is charged at the standard rate. But if you're a charity, health body, educational institution, housing association or finance house, the work may well fall into a category that justifies zero-rating - and you could make a massive saving