NCVCCO rebrands as Children England

The leading membership organisation for children's charities has today changed its name.

The organisation, whose 100 members include the NSPCC, Barnardo's and Action for Children, was previously known as the National Council of Voluntary Child Care Organisations.

It is the second time the organisation, which represents the views of the children's voluntary sector, has rebranded in its 65-year history.

Founded in 1943 as the Constituent Societies of the National Council of Associated Children's Homes, it adopted the name NCVCCO in 1965.

The charity, whose £1.1m income is derived mainly from statutory grants and membership fees, spent £10,000 on the rebrand.

Joe Levenson, director of policy and communications at Children England, said the old name "was quite a mouthful" and didn't reflect that many members' work extended beyond childcare.

Maggie Jones, chief executive of Children England, said: "Children England provides a fresh and more visible platform for the collective voice of the voluntary sector."

Richard McKenna, director of design and communications agency Strudel, which developed the new image, said NCVCCO was a "clumsy and alienating" abbreviation and that the new name was "simple, clear and memorable".

* The Pattaya Orphanage Trust is to change its name from the start of next year. It will be called the Thai Children's Trust to reflect the fact that its work now extends beyond the Thai resort town of Pattaya.

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