Paul Hamlyn Foundation awards £1.2m in grants to six charities

The foundation's Backbone Fund will help to support the chosen organisations over five years

Mohammed Yahya of Native Sun performing at Koko London, Refugee Week 2018, for Counterpoints Arts (Photograph: José Farinha)
Mohammed Yahya of Native Sun performing at Koko London, Refugee Week 2018, for Counterpoints Arts (Photograph: José Farinha)

The Paul Hamlyn Foundation has made £1.2m of grants available to six charities.

The grants are part of the foundation’s Backbone Fund to support organisations building resilience in sectors of interest to the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

This year’s grantees are: the Children and Young People’s Mental Health Coalition; Council for Wales of Voluntary Youth Services; Counterpoints Arts; the Institute for Voluntary Action Research; the Museums Association; and ShareAction.

Each charity will receive up to £50,000 annually for five years, with the grants designed to provide regular, long-term funding for the charities involved.

Each of the six charities has been awarded a total of between £150,000 and £250,000 over the five-year period. 

Moira Sinclair, chief executive of the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, said: "Fundamental principles such as trust-based grant-making, long-term core support and an acknowledgement that policy development and advocacy have value are at the heart of this portfolio.

"Since we started the Backbone Fund three years ago, these grants have helped to support a growing number of sector-critical organisations and, in doing so, the wider civil society eco-system."

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