Paul Hamlyn Foundation hopes report on its grant-making activities will promote transparency

The grant-maker has published its third annual report, summarising what it has learnt from the grants it has given out since 2015

Longer-term grants and greater recognition of the value of core funding are among the trends identified in a report published today by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

Review of UK Grant-making is the foundation's third annual report, summarising what it has learnt from the 650 grants awarded since it adopted its current strategy in 2015.

The foundation, which increased its funding from £25.5m to £37.4m in 2018/19, hopes that sharing information each year will promote transparency and enhance learning across the grant-making sector.

The review says the move towards greater core funding "reflects our ambition to be a flexible grant-maker who is responsive to the needs of organisations".

It added that increased longer-term funding recognised the importance of stability in difficult times. The foundation currently issues grants lasting from one to 10 years.

The report also identifies working in partnership with other funders as an emerging trend. The foundation and Comic Relief collaborate on a tech-for-good funding initiative, for example. 

The findings are based on conversations with staff and grantees as well as analysis of grantees' reports and evaluations.

Moira Sinclair, chief executive of the foundation, said: "The review demonstrates how the foundation has been responding and where we could go further.

"In an increasingly complex world, the importance of reflecting on what we hear and the impact of what we fund continue to be important tools to guide our approach and ensure our strategy is working to its fullest."

The foundation's funding is based around six main strategic priorities: nurturing people and ideas; arts access and participation; education and learning through the arts; arts evidence; working with young people; and migration and integration.

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