Revealed: The charities most likely to receive legacies from their supporters

A league table produced by the market research company fastmap is based on interviews with more than 5,000 older charity donors

Animal charities continue to dominate a league table of the charities that are most likely to receive legacy gifts from their supporters.

The Legacy Potential Premier League Table 2020-2021, produced by the research company fastmap and the consultancy Freestyle Marketing, ranks charities by their potential to generate gifts in wills from existing supporters.

The league table, which is based on interviews over the past year with more than 5,000 charity supporters over the age of 50, features animal charities in the top six slots, and seven of the top 10.

Dogs Trust jumped up from fourth in last year’s study to the top spot this time around, with Cats Protection dropping to second.

Breast Cancer Now was the highest-ranked non-animal charity.

Notable climbers year on year included Guide Dogs, which jumped from 18th last year to number nine, and PDSA, which rose five places to fifth.

The conservation charity Woodland Trust was the highest new entry to the top 30, in at 13, while Unicef also jumped in, at one spot lower.

Fallers included the RNLI, which fell 13 spots to 27th, Shelter, which dropped 11 places to 19th, and the NSPCC, which was down from eighth to 16th.

Fastmap said Dogs Trust and Cats Protection had “almost doubled their scale of support since last year, marking a pull away from their close competitors whose levels have stayed the same”.

The company said the rise might be connected to a rise in pet ownership since the coronavirus pandemic began.

It said that four out of 10 people were considering leaving a legacy to charity.

The top 10

(last year’s position)

1 (4) Dogs Trust

2 (1) Cats Protection

3 (3) Battersea

4 (2) The Donkey Sanctuary

5 (10) PDSA

6 (8) RSPCA

7 (6) Breast Cancer Now

8 (5) Cancer Research UK

9 (18) Guide Dogs

10 (11) Prostate Cancer UK

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