Scores of voluntary sector figures recognised in bumper honours list

The Queen's Birthday Honours List was delayed from the summer to allow for additional people to recognised for outstanding work during the coronavirus pandemic

A CBE medal (Photograph: Dominic Lipinski-WPA Pool/Getty Images)
A CBE medal (Photograph: Dominic Lipinski-WPA Pool/Getty Images)

Hundreds of voluntary and community sector figures have been recognised in a bumper Queen’s Birthday Honours list. 

The honours, which were put back from the usual June publication date to allow for people who had done exceptional work during the coronavirus pandemic to be added to the list, include a knighthood for Geoff Mulgan, who was chief executive of the innovation charity Nesta until last year. 

There were CBEs for Lynne Berry, former chief executive of the Royal Voluntary Service and who chaired the Commission on Ageing and the Voluntary Sector in 2014, Joanna Elson, chief executive of the Money Advice Trust and Tessy Ojo, chief executive of the young people’s charity The Diana Award. 

Karen Pollock, chief executive of the Holocaust Memorial Trust, received the same honour, as did Jonathan Douglas, chief executive of the National Literacy Trust, and Maria McGill, former chief executive of Children’s Hospices Across Scotland.

CBEs also went to Ros Kerslake, chief executive of the National Lottery Heritage Fund, and Matt Smith, chief executive of the social investment body The Key Fund. 

Most of the list was compiled before the coronavirus pandemic struck but it was delayed to allow an additional 414 people to receive honours because of their outstanding work during the outbreak, the Cabinet Office said. 

There were pandemic-related OBEs for voluntary sector people including Ndidi Okezie, chief executive of UK Youth, Sacha Romanovitch, chief executive of Fair4All Finance, Fran Perrin, founder of the grant-maker Indigo Trust, and Kathy Mohan, chief executive of Housing Justice. 

Covid-related MBEs were awarded to those including Sufina Ahmad, director of the John Ellerman Foundation, Kunle Olulode, director of Voice4Change England, Rebecca Kennelly, director of volunteering at the Royal Voluntary Service, Sandra Meadows, chief executive of Voscur, which supports voluntary sector organisations in Bristol, and Andrew Lord, chief executive of the homelessness charity Alabaré. 

Richard Hawkes, chief executive of the British Asian Trust and a former head of Scope, was among a host of voluntary sector people to be given pre-Covid OBEs.  

Others included Chris Askew, chief executive of Diabetes UK, Graham Duxbury, chief executive of Groundwork UK, Peter Cardy, former Macmillan Cancer Support chief executive, Olivia Marks-Woldman, chief executive of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, and Sanjiv Nichani, founder and chief executive of the children’s cardiac surgical charity Healing Little Hearts. 

Nicola Sharp-Jeffs, founder and chief executive of Surviving Economic Abuse, was also appointed OBE, in the same week she was the joint winner of the Rising Chief Executive award at the Third Sector Awards. 

Pre-coronavirus MBEs went to those including Simon Morris, former chief executive of Jewish Care, Alison Oliver, chief executive of the Youth Sport Trust,  Denise Yates, former chief executive of the gifted children’s charity Potential Plus UK, Yvonne Lawson, founder and chief executive of the young people’s development charity the Godwin Lawson Foundation, and Colette McKeaveney, director of Age Concern Luton. 

The Cabinet Office said 72 per cent of the 1,495 people who had been honoured had been recognised for service to their local community. 

It said the list was the most ethnically diverse to date, with 13 per cent of the recipients from a minority ethnic background.

Topics:
Governance

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