Survey shows increases in wages and resignations

The median pay of staff in the third sector rose by 3.7 per cent over the past 12 months, according to a survey by salary analysts Remuneration Economics.

Last year's survey showed that median pay rose by 4.9 per cent in the preceding 12-month period.

The survey, which is endorsed by umbrella body the NCVO and the UK Workforce Hub, also shows that the percentage of sector staff who resigned over the past year was 8.7 per cent, compared with 5.6 per cent the year before. A total of 62 per cent of charities reported difficulties recruiting staff; 57 per cent had difficulties keeping staff.

"The most commonly cited reasons for retention problems were a perceived lack of career progression, followed by salary levels," the report says.

The survey, which collated data from 170 organisations, also reveals the national median salaries for employees in the sector for the year. They ranged from £56,186 for directors to £12,835 for junior or trainee staff.

Function heads were paid a median salary of almost £40,000, specialists and professionals earned £27,441 and administrative officers were paid £17,962.

The research also reveals that the proportion of third sector workers receiving bonuses has plummeted.

In 2005, 9.7 per cent of staff surveyed were given bonuses; in this year's survey, that figure had fallen to 3 per cent.

The value of the average bonus payment also dropped slightly over the past year, from £1,128 in 2006 to £1,099 this year. Executive staff were far more likely to receive bonuses.

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