Only a tenth of public 'would share data with a charity'

According to a survey by the accountancy firm KPMG, respondents said they were less likely to share their data with charities than with pharmaceutical companies

Data sharing: charities barely trusted
Data sharing: charities barely trusted

Only 11 per cent of people would be willing to share their data with a charity even if it meant receiving an improved service, a survey by the accountancy firm KPMG has found.

Researchers said the figures showed the sector had a "trust deficit" brought on by news stories about the misuse of data by some charities.

The survey of 2,000 people in the UK for KPMG’s report How the UK Can Win the AI Race, published this week, found people were less likely to give their data to charities than to pharmaceutical companies, to which 15 per cent said they would give their personal information.

Almost a quarter (24 per cent) said they would not give their information to any of the types of organisation listed, which also included the NHS (56 per cent said they would give their information), banks (47 per cent would) and government (22 per cent would).

The only organisations from a suggested list of nine types of organisation that came below charities were internet companies, media companies (both 8 per cent) and political organisations (7 per cent).

Rebecca Pope, lead data scientist at KPMG UK, said: "The findings from our survey show how the charity sector has a trust deficit when it comes to the public’s willingness to share personal data."

She said isolated news stories on how individual organisations had misused data in the past had damaged the entire sector’s brand.

"With data so important to effective fundraising and building ongoing brand relationships, the charity sector has a particular interest in both exhibiting collective best practice and pushing for new public standards more widely," she said.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in