UK students raise £1m in a week for Islamic Relief

The money was raised during the charity's Charity Week from a range of activities, including a banana auctioned for £6,000

Students in the UK raised a record £1m in a single week for Islamic Relief as part of the humanitarian organisation’s Charity Week campaign last month.

During Charity Week, Muslim student societies at universities across the UK raised money for Islamic Relief through a range of activities, including bucket collections, bake sales and sumo wrestling.

The fundraising efforts included a banana auction, in which students from London universities banded together to bid on a banana that ultimately sold for £6,000. Three cakes produced by different universities sold for a total of £40,000 at the sale event.

The campaign, which ran between 22 and 28 October, saw students in the UK raise £1.01m, while their counterparts in Canada, Qatar, Germany, the US, Australia and South Africa raised almost £360,000, taking the international total to £1.3m.

It is the largest amount raised by the campaign, which has been running since 2003.

Tufail Hussain, deputy director of Islamic Relief UK, said the fundraised total was "a phenomenal achievement" and all the credit belonged to the students involved.

"Their commitment and willpower is simply inspiring," he said. "They have already started thinking about what they can do to achieve even more next year."

Wajid Akhter, who founded Charity Week, said: "To raise more than a million pounds in one week, while juggling studies, is an incredible achievement.

"The campaign epitomises unity and what can be achieved when we are united with the vision of helping those less fortunate than us to build a better, more hopeful world."

The money will go towards supporting children’s projects run by Islamic Relief in the UK and around the world, including building schools in Mali, refurbishing orphanages in Syria and helping children to go to school in Afghanistan, the charity said in a statement.

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