WaterAid appoints new chief executive

Tim Wainwright will take over in May from Barbara Frost, who is retiring after 11 years at the charity

Tim Wainwright
Tim Wainwright

WaterAid UK has appointed Tim Wainwright as its next chief executive.

Wainwright, who has spent the past six years as chief executive of ADD International, which supports disabled people living in poverty in Africa and Asia, will take over in May from Barbara Frost, who is retiring after 11 years in the role.

Wainwright, who is also chair of the international development membership body Bond, has also held senior roles at Oxfam, VSO and the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Tim Clark, chair of WaterAid UK, said Wainwright would bring a wealth of relevant knowledge and experience to the role.

"Tim has a strong commitment to equality and human rights, which are central elements of WaterAid’s work and our vision of a world where everyone has access to water, sanitation and hygiene," he said.

Wainwright said he felt "privileged and incredibly excited" to be taking up the new role.

A WaterAid spokeswoman was unable to confirm how much Wainwright would be paid. Frost received £132,080 in 2015/16, according to the charity’s annual report.

WaterAid, which provides which provides water, sanitation and hygiene in 37 developing countries, had an income of £85.5m in the year to the end of March 2016. 

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